Design based on Gaudi

Gaudi Segrada Familia in Barcelona is an incredible experience to be in.   This piece, not quite done, is strongly based on a portion of the church’s design.  If one viewed it as graphic design, one might say, “that is wild”.  I tried to be faithful to the original source, and then take off on it to create something of my own.  It was done in black ink, Payne’s Gray, sepia and burnt umber watercolor

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The Barcelona church by Gaudi, the Segrada Familia, is an amazing experience.   I sat in one chair for 2.5 hours trying to capture some of it in ink on paper, but my wife took a series of great shots, and I decided to base some art on them.  This is the skeletal version of my first attempt.

Gaudi ceiling

Gaudi ceiling

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Small abstract 2 March 23, 2016this is one of the many smaller abstracts I’ve been creating on a nearly daily basis.  My show is still going on at the Avalon Salon on B Street San Rafael.

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Gaudi’s church in Barcelona, the Familia Segrada is an amazing place.  It is, at once, awesome, colorful, subtle, crazy, and has a logic all its own.   A few years ago, my Pamela took a series of fantastic photos, concentrating on the ceiling from many angles.  The shots are mind-blowing, and I could see how easily many of them could be used as springboards for intricate abstract designs.  I finally got around to doing the initial tracing from one of the photos, a laborious task.   It is now ready to project on to watercolor paper, and I can already see how strong it is going to be.  In the absence of any tight deadlines on the commercial front, I’ll devote some time to art for art’s sake.

Gaudi ceiling

Gaudi ceiling

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Stairway abstract Oct 5 2015The art was hung last night at the Avalon Salon on B street , San Rafael, 25 pieces in all.  Looking around, I had to take some pride in the body of work, and how good it all looked.   There are 7 in identical frames, which helps the presentation, and most of the pieces have good impact.  None have titles.  Ironically, the one I have pictured here was left out of the show due to the mat it’s in, which doesn’t quite work with the art.  One of these days, I’ll re-frame it.  So, this Friday night will be the opening, and I hope to have fun, and get a good turn out.  3 Blue Herons went up too in one room.

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EPA Abstract third versionHere is the final art of the piece that seemed to create itself when I looked at the old frame and mat.  A few days ago, I showed it in its infancy.   I call it the “E.P.A. Abstract” because its style reminds me of murals from the 1930’s, many of which were commissioned by the U.S. government to create jobs for artists, a fine idea.   this is actually a semi-abstract, since there is a human form in it.

It will be included in my show of abstracts at the Avalon Salon in San Rafael, with the opening night being March 11th.

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Abstract in progress Feb 27This piece was done a few days ago, and I call it “Abstract Superman 136” in reference to the color scheme of the 1959 comic book cover I first saw way back then.  The color combination still gets to me; I resonate to it, I love it!  I’ve also noticed that , to an extent, I view these colors when hiking around Marin County in the Spring.

This piece did not come together easily or readily.  It took some 90 minutes of just sort of fooling around on the page until something began to coalesce, unlike the art done earlier in the week where I envisioned the piece immediately upon viewing the frame, mat, and old art that was in it.   If I thought that experience was going to repeat itself, I was mistaken.   This one was a case of “99% perspiration, 1% inspiration”, and , fortunately, that 1% came on the back end.

Since I have a show of my abstracts coming up soon, it’s been a great deal of fun to create a body of these in the last few months.

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A few days ago, I related the experience of viewing a frame and mat with an old picture of mine it, and instantly seeing a new one.   I practically saw it in its entirety, and then, over the next two days, executed it. It came out nearly exactly as I had foreseen.

Abstract in progress Feb 27So, naturally, I thought I could conjure up this experience again. I had another old picture in an old mat and I stared at it for a long time. Nothing came to me, but I unrolled a piece of hot press watercolor paper, measured out the window of the mat, and waited for that vision to come. I waited. And I waited, nearly staring a hole into that paper. Finally, I picked up a pencil, tried to at least conjure up an emotion, and began to sketch lightly.   I must have done that for 90 minutes thinking, “I got nuthin”, and really it was true. Around the two hour mark, however, something began to coalesce, don’t ask me how, and I followed it. Deciding to work with color, this is close to the final result, cropped a bit, but dynamic, colorful, and not without cohesion. It still has a long way to go, and I never repeated the lovely experience of seeing the art before I picked up a brush, but managed to produce something I’m happy with. Perspiration led to some inspiration.

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art in progressAren’t there times when you just know you’re doing your best work, not only when it’s flowing, but that your work has just taken a leap up to the next level?   I think it’s happening to me today.   An old framed piece that includes a mat with a thick black line was pulled out from the dustbin,, and I swear, I could see an entirely new piece in there, in very strong black and white.  It’s an abstract, or at least a semi-abstract , since there is a human figure who is clearly wilting under the weight of a computer motherboard…..well, maybe I’ll disguise that part a bit, but , for me, that’s the part that gives this more emotional resonance than my other abstracts, which are more stream of conscious and instinctive.  This one does have a clear thought and feeling underlying , and so it becomes more meaningful, and the art itself is complex and will be a knockout piece.  I know, since I’ve already foreseen it its frame.   Shown is a vignette of the art in its infancy stage.

Oh, yes.  I have a show coming up with the opening on March 11th, at the Avalon Salon in San Rafael, B Street, between 4th and 5th, from 5pm -9pm, as part of that night’s Art Walk.

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Abstract August 04  Among the decisions facing an artist upon creating

abstract art are, what to do, where to put it, what color palette am I going to use, and when is it done?

In other words, all decisions are up for grabs, even titling it.  Should I title this one “Moonlight In Vermont”, or “Gray Abstract #12”?  Or, something else?  I think lots of people may feel that abstract

paintings are done by throwing paint at a canvas and seeing what sticks, or, that a monkey could do just

as well.  Maybe not on a piece like this one, since it’s fairly refined and the various areas seem

to be carefully filled in.  The part I enjoy most about creating this type of art is the rapid back and forth discussion between the right and left sides of my brain, which are usually solved by the body.  I find myself gently standing and rocking a bit while making such decisions, so there is, literally, a back and forth thing going on.  Since I create lots of representational art, composition is always a conscious concern as I try to lead the eye, but there are lots of more visceral decisions, mainly about texture.

And, of course, the artist may be as prone as the viewer to “de-abstract” it while working on it.  “Oh, look , I see a duck there!”   I try to avoid that, and the process is most exciting.

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